Charity Song of the Month:

The New Zealand pop band recorded "Help Is Coming" more than 15 years ago, but it could have been written today about the Syrian refugee crisis.  “Help is coming / We sail tomorrow For Ellis Island…Dreams come true,” Neil Finn sings. More than half a million people have been crossing the Mediterranean by boat, sometimes with fatal results. All proceeds from the sale of the song go to Save The Children to help the thousands of refugee children in need of food, safe water, medicine, shelter and psychological support (minus local taxes). In Canada, at least 86-cents of the 99-cent price will go to Save the Children UK.  Buy it here. — Karen Bliss

Canadian patriots B & Steve, whose hoser-rap “Out For A Rip” YouTube video has earned 8.6 million views, have narrowed their focus this time to the Toronto Blue Jays and have decided to donate  a slice of the pizza pie, as they say, to Jays Care Foundation.  The go Jays rap song, “Home Run Anthem,” which features former Blue Jay and World Series champ Kelly Gruber in the video, is out just in time for the playoffs. Through Jays Care Foundation, the Toronto Blue Jays aim to create positive opportunities and increase access to organized sport for children and youth in need across Canada.  The song sells for $1.29 here. — Karen Bliss 

Pink Floyd’s Nick Mason produced this charity song to raise money for Save The Children’s Nepal earthquake appeal fund. British soul singer Beverley Knight handles lead vocals, Mick Jagger sang back-up and Ronnie Wood played guitar. A 100-member Save The Children choir comprised of supporters of the UK charity also added their voices.  "Save the Children (Look into Your Heart)," penned by Matt Clifford, was recorded at London’s famed Abbey Road Studios.  More than 7500 people died and 14,500 were injured in the April 25 earthquake. “We gotta keep on trying to save the children,” Night sings. Buy the song here. — Karen Bliss

In the lead up to the 2015 Special Olympics World Games, taking place July 25-Aug. 2 in Los Angeles, Canadian pop-rock artist Avril Lavigne has released “Fly” to benefit the Special Olympics, which helps people with intellectual disabilities overcome barriers through sports. “This song means a lot to me personally,” Lavigne said in a statement. “It is inspired by the many young people I’ve met throughout my work with my Foundation. They pursue their dreams no matter what obstacles they face.”  “We were all meant to fly…it’s your time to shine…it’s your time to fly,” she sings. Lavigne co-wrote the song with her husband, Chad Kroeger, and David Hodges, and co-produced it with Chris Baseford.  Buy it here. — Karen Bliss

Two of the best modern soul singers today, America’s John Legend and Britain’s Sam Smith, join forces on a charity single for Comic Relief. The powerful song is Smith’s “Lay Me Down” from his 2014 debut album, In The Lonely Hour. Released for UK telethon Red Nose Day March 13, Smith and Legend cut the new version of the song earlier this year in Los Angeles. Universal Music will donate 100 percent of the profits to Comic Relief which uses the money “to tackle the root causes of poverty and social injustice in the UK and across the world.” Buy it here. Red Nose Day — on which the pair performed — airs in the U.S. on NBC May 21. — Karen Bliss

In late October, Taylor Swift announced that all the proceeds from “Welcome to New York”— from her 2014 album, 1989 — would go to the New York City Department of Education, which serves 1.1 million students in more than 1800 public schools. In late February, the 25-year-old made the first payment of $50,000 after the pop song was certified gold (500,000 units) by the RIAA.  Co-written by Swift and OneRepublic’s Ryan Tedder, the lyrics celebrate the famed city, where she purchased a penthouse in Tribeca and relocated from Nashville. Additional proceeds from the single will continue to go the NYC D.O.E. schools. Buy it here. — Karen Bliss

Toronto’s Julian Taylor Band is donating $2 from every copy sold of their latest album, Tech Noir, to the Canadian Women’s Foundation, whose mandate is to “empower women and girls in Canada to move out of violence, out of poverty and into confidence.” When the Jian Ghomeshi scandal made headlines last fall, it sparked open conversation about sexual violence and harassment of women and the Julian Taylor Band decided to create the Be Good To Your Woman challenge, named after their soulful song.  The idea is to create and share a video talking about what it means to be good to your woman.  Go here for instructions. — Karen Bliss

Singer Bif Naked is donating 100 percent of the song proceeds to AIDS Vancouver. "Intellectual" — from a series of dance tracks she wrote and recorded with Jason Darr (Out of Your Mouth, Neurosonic) — was intended to be lighthearted and fun. She tells Samaritanmag the song is “truly an anthem for self-esteem, for gender fluidity and sexual self-identity, which empowered us and empowered our friends.” Some of the lyrics are: “Leave no stone unturned, for this is your life…what are you? What do you want to be? Are you a boy or a girl? Intellectual Homosexual! Glamorous Heterosexual! Ambidextrous Metrosexual! Baby, let's get reprehensible! ..." Buy it here. — Karen Bliss

City and Colour’s Dallas Green has been sitting on the ghostly acoustic track "Nowhere Texas" since recording his latest album, The Hurray and the Harm, waiting for find the right cause to donate the proceeds. He told Samaritanmag he wrote it after watching the film Texas Killing Fields about “these girls from these small towns get picked up and raped and killed and dropped into this swamp and they can’t seem to tie any of them together or convict anyone.” Green has finally released it and is donating all proceeds to YWCA of Canada’s Rose Campaign, created after the Montreal massacre of 14 women on Dec. 6 1989 and a year-round effort to reduce violence against women. Buy the song here. — Karen Bliss

Canadian rapper Snow, best known for his 1993 No. 1 hit “Informer,” suffered a great loss when his wife, Tamei, passed away suddenly of cancer in 2009. In her honour, he has released a charity single, “Shame,” featuring reggae legend Mykal Rose (Black Uhuru), and 100 percent of the proceeds go to the Karen E. Mumford Cancer Foundation (KEM). The non-profit provides financial assistance to cancer patients and helps broaden awareness of the disease. Produced by Kent Jones and Cool & Dre, the song, however, isn’t about cancer, rather it explains why he disappeared from the music scene in the U.S. following “Informer.” Buy it here. — Karen Bliss