Ten-Room Live Music Caravan Plus Gala to Feature Tom Cochrane, Mary Margaret O'Hara and Andy Kim

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It's still a little chilly outside so broadcaster/presenter/performer Jaymz Bee, who used to conduct jazz crawls in Toronto, has come up with a fun way to raise money for Unison Benevolent Fund, featuring more than 20 artists, such as Tom Cochrane, Mary Margaret O'Hara and Andy Kim — and it's all indoors.

The aptly titled Jaymz Bee's Caravan of Music will hold simultaneous concerts in 10 rooms at the Old Mill on April 15 over a four hour period.  Funds raised go to Unison, which offers music industry workers emergency fianancial aid, counseling and health services in times of crisis.

Tickets (ie. passport) are $40 which gets you into all of the rooms: The Westminster Room, The Drawing Room, The Garden Room, The Balmoral Room, The Humber Room, The Victoria Room, The Chapel, The York Room, The Mill Room, The Home Smith Bar.   As you exit the room,  your passport is stamped and those with completed passports are entered in a draw for some prizes at the end of the night.

The night also features a gala dinner from  6 to 8 p.m. for $200 with a concert that features many of the night's performers as well as a guest appearance by Tom Cochrane "and friends." Gala ticket holders can also particupate in the room roam-around.

Other performers include Alex Pangman, Barbra Lica, Denielle Bassels,  Jay Douglas, Eric St-Laurent, John Finley, Lou Pomanti, Lily Frost, Ron Davis, Joe Sealy, Nancy Walke, Bill King, Adrean Farrugia, Bill Bell, Robert Scott,  George Koller, Michael Dunston, Ted Quinlan, Daniel Barnes,Bill McBirnie, Bernie Senensky, Melissa Lauren, Nathan Hiltz, Big Rude Jake, Joe Hash, Marie Goudy, Jocelyn Barth, Heather Luckhart, Attila Fias and Lisa Particelli.

The benefit — sponsored by Now magazine, Vesuvius Music, Slaight Music, Moricone Investments, Wayne Anaka, Zoomer, and Long & McQuade — comes as many Canadian music industry workers are self-employed and contract workers, without health benefits or other rainy day funds.

"For many, a career in music is a dream come true; however, the reality is that many members of the Canadian music community do not have access to the services that can make all the difference in a time of need: sick leave, medical benefits, pension plans, and unemployment insurance," the Unison Benevolent Fund, established in 2010, says on its website.

Those in crisis can access free confidential support services, including counselling, to assist industry professionals and their immediate family members dealing with health, legal, relationships or work-related concerns.

To register for the Unison fund, industry professionals must have worked in the industry for at least two years and for over half of their careers, and earned at least 55 percent of their income from the Canadian music industry, if they are over 65 years of age.

Industry professionals could be a musician, songwriter, producer and engineer, label and publisher personnel, manager, agent or promoters, or staff from associations, funders or collectives.

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