Vancouver Act Galactic Hobos Donating Proceeds From Two New Singles To Parkinson's Research

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Vancouver electronic act Galactic Hobos are releasing two new singles as part of Parkinson’s Awareness month with proceeds from the songs going towards The Michael J. Fox Foundation For Parkinson’s Research.

The first song "Stutter" has already been released and is available for purchase. The second single "Don't Call Me Baby" will be released on April 16. Additionally, the band has set up a donations page with a $1,000 fundraising goal for those who want to contribute more.

Parkinson's disease is a chronic, degenerative neurological disorder that affects the central nervous system. The symptoms of the disease, which increase in severity as time passes, include shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement, and difficulty with walking. An estimated one in 100 people over age 60 have Parkinson's.

It's a disease that's also very familiar to Galactic Hobos. Jeff Stojak, who makes up one-half of the Galactic Hobos along with Oliver Plé, has had Parkinson's for more than a decade.

"Bringing awareness to this disease has become very important to us,” says Stojak, in a statement, “but what has become even more important is bringing awareness to the fact that you can rise above it."

"Pursuing our passion for music was a given — but one of us being diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at such a young age was something we could have never seen coming,” added Galactic Hobos’ Oliver Plé. “In the years since the diagnosis, one of the biggest obstacles one could ever imagine has turned into one of the biggest sources of motivation and inspiration we have. Having something with that kind of weight behind it definitely gives you perspective and focus.’

Created by Canadian actor and Back To The Future star Michael J. Fox, the Michael J. Fox Foundation For Parkinson’s Research was founded in 2000 with the goal of "finding a cure for Parkinson’s disease and to ensuring the development of improved therapies for those living with Parkinson’s today." Since its inception the foundation has raised more than $800 million towards Parkinson's disease research.

The 57-year-old Fox was diagnosed with Parkinson's in 1991 and has dedicated extensive time and effort over the years towards causes related to the eradication of the disease.

A rising West Coast act, Galactic Hobos released their first single in 2017. Their funky electro sound and penchant for wearing space helmets during live sets evokes Daft Punk vibes. The band has shared stages with the likes of Baauer, Stickybuds and Das Mortal.

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